Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2445/102453
Title: Tuberculous spondylitis diagnosed through Xpert MTB/RIF assay in urine: a case report.
Author: Sikalengo, George
Ramírez, Adria
Faini, Diana
Mwamelo, Kim
Battegay, Manuel
Jugheli, Levan
Hatz, Christoph
Reither, Klaus
Letang, Emilio
Keywords: Tuberculosi
Espondiloartropaties
Tuberculosis
Spondyloarthropathies
Issue Date: 26-Sep-2016
Publisher: BioMed Central
Abstract: Background: Extrapulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB) is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Diagnosis of EPTB is challenging in resource-limited settings due to difficulties in obtaining samples, as well as the paucibacillarity of the specimens. Skeletal tuberculosis accounts for 10–35 % of EPTB cases, with vertebral osteomyelitis (Pott’s disease) representing 50 % of the cases. We present two cases of suspected Pott’s disease, diagnosed through GeneXpert MTB/RIF assay in urine at a rural Tanzanian hospital. Case Presentation: Case I: A 49-year old male, HIV-1 positive, on co-formulated tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/lamivudine/efavirenz since 2009 and CD4 counts of 205 cells/μL (13 %). He presented with lower back pain and progressive lower limb weakness for two weeks prior to admission. The physical examination revealed bilateral flaccid paraplegia with reduced reflexes, but otherwise unremarkable findings. A lateral lumbar X-ray showed noticeable reduction of intervertebral space between L4 and L5, and a small calcification in the anterior longitudinal ligament between L4 and L5, being compatible with focal spondylosis deformans but inconclusive with regard to tuberculous spondylitis. An abdominal ultrasound showed normal kidneys, bladder and prostate gland. The urinalysis and complete blood counts (CBC) were normal. M. Tuberculosis was detected through GeneXpert MTB/RIF in centrifuged urine, with no resistance to rifampicin. Case II: A 76-year old female, HIV-1 negative, presented with lower back pain and progressive weakness and numbness of the lower limbs for two months prior to admission. The physical examination revealed paraplegia, but otherwise unremarkable findings. The lumbosacral X-ray findings were compatible with spondylosis deformans of the lumbar spine and possible tuberculous spondylitis in L3-L4. The abdominal and renal ultrasound showed normal kidneys and bladder. The urinalysis and CBC were normal. M. Tuberculosis was detected through GeneXpert MTB/RIF in centrifuged urine, with no resistance to rifampicin. Conclusion: We report two cases of suspected tuberculous spondylitis diagnosed through Xpert MTB/RIF in urine samples from a rural Tanzanian hospital. Urine testing using Xpert MTB/RIF reflects disseminated disease and renal involvement, and may offer a feasible additional diagnostic approach for Pott’s disease in rural Africa.
Note: Reproducció del document publicat a: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12879-016-1844-0
It is part of: BMC Infectious Diseases, 2016, vol. 16, num. 514
Related resource: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12879-016-1844-0
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2445/102453
ISSN: 1471-2334
Appears in Collections:Articles publicats en revistes (ISGlobal)

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