Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2445/113438
Title: Analyzing male attractiveness models from a communicative approach: socialization, attraction, and gender-based violence
Author: Díez Palomar, Francisco Javier
Capllonch Bujosa, Marta
Aiello, E.
Keywords: Violència de gènere
Comunicació
Estereotip (Psicologia)
Gender violence
Communication
Stereotype (Psychology)
Issue Date: 2014
Publisher: SAGE Publications
Abstract: Although the analysis of male attractiveness models is key to shed light into the prevention of gender-based violence (GBV), it is not always easy to access crucial information about these models. Research shows that inadequate data collection techniques can lead to reproducing superficial arguments confirming existing stereotypes instead of tackling with the real connections. Using communicative daily life stories and communicative focus groups, we take on the challenge of accessing the existing models of male attractiveness' foundations. These techniques are used to collect data about the specific attractiveness models into which adolescents are socialized and their potential link to violence. We argue that the communicative orientation furthers the scientific understanding of the dominant traditional model of masculinity that socializes into GBV and the new alternative model of masculinity that socializes into its overcoming. The use of communicative techniques is showed to empower participants to question their attractive preferences.
Note: Versió postprint del document publicat a: https://doi.org/10.1177/1077800414537205
It is part of: Qualitative Inquiry, 2014, vol. 20, num. 7, p. 844-849
Related resource: https://doi.org/10.1177/1077800414537205
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2445/113438
ISSN: 1077-8004
Appears in Collections:Articles publicats en revistes (Didàctica de les Ciències Socials, de l'Educació Musical, de l'Educació Física i de l'Educació Visual i Plàstica)

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
634558.pdf280.7 kBAdobe PDFView/Open


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.