Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2445/113445
Title: Incidental mosquitocidal effect of an ivermectin mass drug administration on Anopheles farauti conducted for scabies control in the Solomon Islands
Author: Kositz, Christian
Talina, Jeptah
Diau, Jason
Asugeni, Rowena
Whitehorn, Cheryl
Mabey, David
Chaccour, Carlos
Marks, Michael
Keywords: Malària
Medicina tropical
Salomó
Malaria
Tropical medicine
Solomon Islands
Issue Date: 1-Mar-2017
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Abstract: Background: The Solomon Islands is targeting elimination of malaria by 2030. The dominant vector is the predominantly exophagic, exophilic Anopheles farauti sensu strictu. This biting behaviour limits the efficacy of conventional vector control tools and highlights the need for new strategies. When administered to humans ivermectin has been shown to have a mosquitocidal effect. Mass drug administration (MDA) with ivermectin is an emerging strategy in the control of scabies. In this study we explored any incidental effect of ivermectin MDA conducted for scabies control on mosquitoes. Methods: MDA for scabies was conducted in three villages. We performed human landing catches and measured 5-day mortality amongst Anopheles mosquitoes caught before and after MDA. Cox regression was used to calculate hazard ratios (HR) for mortality between mosquitoes caught before and after MDA. Results: There was a significant increase in 5-day mortality in anopheline mosquitoes caught post-MDA which was highest on the day of MDA itself (HR 4.2 95% CI 1.8 to 10.1, p=0.001) and the following day (HR 4.4 95% CI 1.8 to 10.8, p=0.002) compared to mosquitoes caught before MDA. Conclusions: This study shows a possible mosquitocidal effect of ivermectin MDA conducted for scabies control. Studies with a larger sample size with clinical as well as entomological outcomes should be conducted in this population.
Note: Reproducció del document publicat a: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/trstmh/trx025
It is part of: Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 2017, vol. 111, num. 3, p. 97-101
Related resource: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/trstmh/trx025
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2445/113445
ISSN: 0035-9203
Appears in Collections:Articles publicats en revistes (ISGlobal)

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
kositz2017_2563.pdf232.07 kBAdobe PDFView/Open


This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License Creative Commons