Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2445/137381
Title: Cerebrospinal fluid neurofilament light levels in neurodegenerative dementia: Evaluation of diagnostic accuracy in the differential diagnosis of prion diseases
Author: Zerr, Inga
Schmitz, Matthias
Karch, André
Villar Piqué, Anna
Kanata, Eirini
Golanska, Ewa
Diaz-Lucena, Daniela
Llorens Torres, Franc
Hermann, Peter
Knipper, Tobias
Goebel, Stefan
Varges, Daniela
Sklaviadis, Theodoros
Sikorska, Beata
Liberski, Pawel P.
Ladogana, Anna Sánchez
Ferrer, Isidro (Ferrer Abizanda)
Zetterberg, Henrik
Blennow, Kaj
Calero, Miguel
Sánchez del Valle Díaz, Raquel
Baldeiras, Inês
Keywords: Líquid cefalorraquidi
Degeneració (Patologia)
Demència
Malalties per prions
Cerebrospinal fluid
Degeneration (Pathology)
Dementia
Prion diseases
Issue Date: Jun-2018
Publisher: Elsevier Masson
Abstract: Introduction: neurofilament light (NFL) levels in the cerebrospinal fluid are increased in several neurodegenerative dementias. However, their diagnostic accuracy in the differential diagnostic context is unknown. Methods: cerebrospinal fluid NFL levels were quantified in nonprimarily neurodegenerative neurological and psychiatric diseases (n = 122), mild cognitive impairment (n = 48), Alzheimer's disease (n = 108), dementia with Lewy bodies/Parkinson's disease dementia (n = 53), vascular dementia (n = 46), frontotemporal dementia (n = 41), sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD, n = 132), and genetic prion diseases (n = 182). Results: the highest NFL levels were detected in sCJD, followed by vascular dementia, frontotemporal dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies/Parkinson's disease dementia, Alzheimer's disease, and mild cognitive impairment. In sCJD, NFL levels correlated with cerebrospinal fluid tau and disease duration. NFL levels were able to differentiate sCJD from nonprimarily neurodegenerative neurological and psychiatric diseases (area under the curve = 0.99, 95% confidence interval: 0.99-1) and from the other diagnostic groups showing cognitive impairment/dementia of a non-CJD etiology (area under the curve = 0.90, 95% confidence interval: 0.87-0.92). Compared to nonprimarily neurodegenerative neurological and psychiatric diseases, NFL was also elevated in genetic prion diseases associated with the E200K, V210I, P102L, and D178N prion protein gene mutations. Discussion: increased NFL levels are a common feature in neurodegenerative dementias.
Note: Versió postprint del document publicat a: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jalz.2017.12.008
It is part of: Alzheimer's & Dementia, 2018, vol. 14, num. 6, p. 751-763
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2445/137381
Related resource: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jalz.2017.12.008
ISSN: 1552-5260
Appears in Collections:Articles publicats en revistes (Patologia i Terapèutica Experimental)
Articles publicats en revistes (Medicina)
Articles publicats en revistes (Institut d'lnvestigació Biomèdica de Bellvitge (IDIBELL))
Articles publicats en revistes (IDIBAPS: Institut d'investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer)

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