Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2445/174406
Title: Still using MS Excel? Implementation of the WHO Go.Data software for the COVID‐19 contact tracing
Author: Llupià, Anna
García Basteiro, Alberto
Puig i Sadurní, Joaquim
Keywords: COVID-19
Programari
COVID-19
Computer software
Issue Date: Jun-2020
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Abstract: In the fight against the current epidemic of COVID‐19, contact tracing has been used with success in China, as part of a series of containment efforts.1 Historically, data collection has been done through paper forms and, over time, this data collection has been digitalized, usually using the tools at hand, which are typically spreadsheets and custom‐made databases, and in some cases, specialized software.2 Throughout the world, many agents, from regional public health agencies to hospitals of all levels, have to choose a platform to record cases, determine exposures, register contacts, and manage their follow‐up assessments, that is, document all the events in the chains of transmission. Although in small outbreaks the management of this information is not overwhelming, and spreadsheets or small ad‐hoc databases can be used, in an outbreak of the scale of COVID‐19, with a high number of cases and around 36 contacts for each one,3 these traditional solutions may not be scalable to the required levels. Needless to say, the speed and effectiveness of contact tracking are critical elements for this tool to help contain the COVID‐19 epidemic.
Note: Reproducció del document publicat a: https://doi.org/10.1002/hsr2.164
It is part of: Health Science Reports, 2020, vol. 3(2), num. e164
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2445/174406
Related resource: https://doi.org/10.1002/hsr2.164
ISSN: 2398-8835
Appears in Collections:Articles publicats en revistes (ISGlobal)
Articles publicats en revistes (Medicina)

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