Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2445/176126
Title: Early Parental Death and Risk of Psychosis in Offspring: A Six-Country Case-Control Study
Author: Misra, Supriya
Gelaye, Bizu
Koenen, Karestan C.
Williams, David R.
Borba, Christina P.C.
Quattrone, Diego
Di Forti, Marta
La Cascia, Caterina
La Barbera, Daniele
Tarricone, Ilaria
Berardi, Domenico
Szöke, Andrei
Arango, Celso
Tortelli, Andrea
de Haan, Lieuwe
Velthorst, Eva
Bobes García, Julio
Bernardo Arroyo, Miquel
Sanjuán, Julio
Santos, José Luís
Arrojo, Manuel
Del-Ben, Cristina Marta
Rossi Menezes, Paulo
Selten, Jean Paul
Jones, Peter B.
Kirkbride, James B.
EU-GEI WP2 Group
Rutten, Bart P.F.
van Os, Jim
Murray, Robin M.
Anderson, Charlotte Gayer
Morgan, Craig
Keywords: Psicosi en els infants
Mortalitat
Dol
Psychoses in children
Mortality
Bereavement
Issue Date: 23-Jul-2019
Publisher: MDPI
Abstract: Evidence for early parental death as a risk factor for psychosis in offspring is inconclusive. We analyzed data from a six-country, case-control study to examine the associations of early parental death, type of death (maternal, paternal, both), and child's age at death with psychosis, both overall and by ethnic group. In fully adjusted multivariable mixed-effects logistic regression models, experiencing early parental death was associated with 1.54-fold greater odds of psychosis (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.23, 1.92). Experiencing maternal death had 2.27-fold greater odds (95% CI: 1.18, 4.37), paternal death had 1.14-fold greater odds (95% CI: 0.79, 1.64), and both deaths had 4.42-fold greater odds (95% CI: 2.57, 7.60) of psychosis compared with no early parental death. Experiencing parental death between 11 and 16 years of age had 2.03-fold greater odds of psychosis than experiencing it before five years of age (95% CI: 1.02, 4.04). In stratified analyses, experiencing the death of both parents had 9.22-fold greater odds of psychosis among minority ethnic groups (95% CI: 2.02-28.02) and no elevated odds among the ethnic majority (odds ratio (OR): 0.96; 95% CI: 0.10-8.97), which could be due in part to the higher prevalence of early parental death among minority ethnic groups but should be interpreted cautiously given the wide confidence intervals.
Note: Reproducció del document publicat a: https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8071081
It is part of: Journal of Clinical Medicine, 2019, vol. 8, num. 7, p. 1081
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2445/176126
Related resource: https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8071081
ISSN: 2077-0383
Appears in Collections:Articles publicats en revistes (Medicina)

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