Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2445/34442
Title: Role of the cellular prion protein in oligodendrocyte precursor cell proliferation and differentiation in the developing and adult mouse CNS
Author: Bribián Arruego,Ana
Fontana, X.
Llorens, Franc
Gavín Marín, Rosalina
Reina del Pozo, Manuel
García-Verdugo, J.M.
Torres, Juan María
Castro, F. de
Río Fernández, José Antonio del
Keywords: Prions
Biologia del desenvolupament
Proliferació cel·lular
Prions
Developmental biology
Cell proliferation
Issue Date: 18-Apr-2012
Publisher: Public Library of Science (PLoS)
Abstract: There are numerous studies describing the signaling mechanisms that mediate oligodendrocyte precursor cell (OPC) proliferation and differentiation, although the contribution of the cellular prion protein (PrPc) to this process remains unclear. PrPc is a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored glycoprotein involved in diverse cellular processes during the development and maturation of the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). Here we describe how PrPc influences oligodendrocyte proliferation in the developing and adult CNS. OPCs that lack PrPc proliferate more vigorously at the expense of a delay in differentiation, which correlates with changes in the expression of oligodendrocyte lineage markers. In addition, numerous NG2-positive cells were observed in cortical regions of adult PrPc knockout mice, although no significant changes in myelination can be seen, probably due to the death of surplus cells.
Note: Reproducció del document publicat a: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0033872
It is part of: PLoS One, 2012, vol. 7, num. 4, p. e33872
Related resource: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0033872
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2445/34442
ISSN: 1932-6203
Appears in Collections:Articles publicats en revistes (Biologia Cel·lular, Fisiologia i Immunologia)

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