Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2445/54811
Title: The Imprint of Geologic History on Within‐Island Diversification of Woodlouse-­Hunter Spiders (Araneae, Dysderidae) in the Canary Islands.
Author: Macías Hernández, Nuria
Bidegaray Batsita, Leticia
Emerson, B.
Oromí, Pedro
Arnedo Lombarte, Miquel Àngel
Keywords: Aranyes
Araneids
Biodiversitat
Filogeografia
Geologia històrica
Canàries
Spiders
Orb weavers
Biodiversity
Phylogeography
Historical geology
Canary Islands
Issue Date: 12-Mar-2013
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Abstract: Geological processes and ecological adaptation are major drivers of diversification on oceanic islands. Although diversification in these islands is often interpreted as resulting from dispersal or island hopping rather than vicariance, this may not be the case in islands with complex geological histories. The island of Tenerife, in the Canary Islands, emerged in the late Miocene as 3 precursor islands that were subsequently connected and reisolated by volcanic cycles. The spider Dysdera verneaui is endemic to the island of Tenerife, where it is widely distributed throughout most island habitats, providing an excellent model to investigate the role of physical barriers and ecological adaptation in shaping within-island diversity. Here, we present evidence that the phylogeographic patterns of this species trace back to the independent emergence of the protoislands. Molecular markers (mitochondrial genes cox1, 16S, and nad1 and the nuclear genes ITS-2 and 28S) analyzed from 100 specimens (including a thorough sampling of D. verneaui populations and additional outgroups) identify 2 distinct evolutionary lineages that correspond to 2 precursor islands, each with diagnostic genital characters indicative of separate species status. Episodic introgression events between these 2 main evolutionary lineages explain the observed incongruence between mitochondrial and nuclear markers, probably as a result of the homogenization of their ITS-2 sequence types. The most widespread lineage exhibits a complex population structure, which is compatible with either secondary contact, following connection of deeply divergent lineages, or alternatively, a back colonization from 1 precursor island to another.
Note: Versió postprint del document publicat a: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jhered/est008
It is part of: Journal of Heredity, 2013, vol. 104, num. 3, p. 341-356
Related resource: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jhered/est008
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2445/54811
ISSN: 0022-1503
Appears in Collections:Articles publicats en revistes (Biologia Evolutiva, Ecologia i Ciències Ambientals)

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