Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2445/98964
Title: Anthropocene and early human behaviour
Author: Albert Cristóbal, Rosa Maria
Keywords: Conducta (Psicologia)
Foc
Gorja d'Olduvai (Tanzània)
Human behavior
Fire
Olduvai Gorge (Tanzania)
Issue Date: 27-May-2015
Publisher: SAGE Publications
Abstract: When is the baseline for Anthropocene? The first indications of human impact on earth closely relate to early human behavior and use of resources. First agricultural societies modified the landscape with the aim of generating their own resources to satisfy the needs of an increasing population. This new system was the result of years of learning and continuous interaction with landscape. Hunter-gatherer societies had shown a vast knowledge of their surrounding environment, which allowed them to exploit and optimize the available resources. But, had these societies the capacity to modify the landscape in such a way that can be traced up until today? How far back in time can we go to find the first evidence of human impact on earth? In this paper, we will try to analyze early human behavior and the possible impact of their activities on the landscape. We will use the paleoanthropological site of Olduvai Gorge (northern Tanzania) as a case study to suggest that the baseline for Anthropocene, taking the term as human impact on earth through cognitive-behavioral strategies, can be moved back to the time when early hominins visited Olduvai. Olduvai Gorge is perfectly suited for this study since the latest scientific research and publications have yielded a detailed knowledge of the vegetation, the landscape, and of the wildlife that lived in the area.
Note: Versió postprint del document publicat a: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0959683615588377
It is part of: Holocene, 2015, vol. 25, num. 10, p. 1542-1552
Related resource: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0959683615588377
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2445/98964
ISSN: 0959-6836
Appears in Collections:Articles publicats en revistes (Història i Arqueologia)

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