Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2445/99569
Title: Sanitation and Hygiene-Specific Risk Factors for Moderate-to-Severe Diarrhea in Young Children in the Global Enteric Multicenter Study, 2007-2011: Case-Control Study.
Author: Baker, Kelly K.
O’Reilly, Ciara E.
Levine, Myron M.
Kotloff, Karen L.
Nataro, James P.
Ayers, Tracy L.
Farag, Tamer H.
Nasrin, Dilruba
Blackwelder, William C.
Wu, Yukun
Alonso, Pedro
Breiman, Robert F.
Omore, Richard
Faruque, Abu S. G.
Kumar Das, Sumon
Ahmed, Shahnawaz
Saha, Debasish
Sow, Samba O.
Sur, Dipika
Zaidi, Anita K. M.
Quadri, Farheen
Mintz, Eric D.
Keywords: Higiene
Diarrea
Infants
Hygiene
Diarrhea
Children
Issue Date: 3-May-2016
Publisher: Public Library of Science (PLoS)
Abstract: Background: Diarrheal disease is the second leading cause of disease in children less than 5 y of age. Poor water, sanitation, and hygiene conditions are the primary routes of exposure and infection. Sanitation and hygiene interventions are estimated to generate a 36% and 48% reduction in diarrheal risk in young children, respectively. Little is known about whether the number of households sharing a sanitation facility affects a child's risk of diarrhea. The objective of this study was to describe sanitation and hygiene access across the Global Enteric Multicenter Study (GEMS) sites in Africa and South Asia and to assess sanitation and hygiene exposures, including shared sanitation access, as risk factors for moderate-to-severe diarrhea (MSD) in children less than 5 y of age. Methods/Findings: The GEMS matched case-control study was conducted between December 1, 2007, and March 3, 2011, at seven sites in Basse, The Gambia; Nyanza Province, Kenya; Bamako, Mali; Manhiça, Mozambique; Mirzapur, Bangladesh; Kolkata, India; and Karachi, Pakistan. Data was collected for 8,592 case children aged <5 y old experiencing MSD and for 12,390 asymptomatic age, gender, and neighborhood-matched controls. An MSD case was defined as a child with a diarrheal illness <7 d duration comprising ≥3 loose stools in 24 h and ≥1 of the following: sunken eyes, skin tenting, dysentery, intravenous (IV) rehydration, or hospitalization. Site-specific conditional logistic regression models were used to explore the association between sanitation and hygiene exposures and MSD. Most households at six sites (>93%) had access to a sanitation facility, while 70% of households in rural Kenya had access to a facility. Practicing open defecation was a risk factor for MSD in children <5 y old in Kenya. Sharing sanitation facilities with 1–2 or ≥3 other households was a statistically significant risk factor for MSD in Kenya, Mali, Mozambique, and Pakistan. Among those with a designated handwashing area near the home, soap or ash were more frequently observed at control households and were significantly protective against MSD in Mozambique and India. Conclusions: This study suggests that sharing a sanitation facility with just one to two other households can increase the risk of MSD in young children, compared to using a private facility. Interventions aimed at increasing access to private household sanitation facilities may reduce the burden of MSD in children. These findings support the current World Health Organization/ United Nations Children's Emergency Fund (UNICEF) system that categorizes shared sanitation as unimproved.
Note: Reproducció del document publicat a: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.1002010
It is part of: PLoS Medicine, 2016, vol. 13, num. 5, p. e1002010
Related resource: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.1002010
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2445/99569
ISSN: 1549-1277
Appears in Collections:Articles publicats en revistes (ISGlobal)

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