Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2445/24883
Title: Conduction mechanisms and charge storage in Si-nanocrystals metal-oxide-semiconductor memory devices studied with conducting atomic force microscopy
Author: Porti i Pujal, Marc
Avidano, M.
Nafría i Maqueda, Montserrat
Aymerich Humet, Xavier
Carreras, Josep
Garrido Fernández, Blas
Keywords: Propietats magnètiques
Microelectrònic
Estructura electrònica
Superfícies (Física)
Interfícies (Ciències físiques)
Pel·lícules fines
Magnetic properties
Microelectronics
Electronic structure
Surfaces (Physics)
Interfaces (Physical sciences)
Thin films
Issue Date: 2-Sep-2005
Publisher: American Institute of Physics
Abstract: In this work, we demonstrate that conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) is a very powerful tool to investigate, at the nanoscale, metal-oxide-semiconductor structures with silicon nanocrystals (Si-nc) embedded in the gate oxide as memory devices. The high lateral resolution of this technique allows us to study extremely small areas ( ~ 300nm2) and, therefore, the electrical properties of a reduced number of Si-nc. C-AFM experiments have demonstrated that Si-nc enhance the gate oxide electrical conduction due to trap-assisted tunneling. On the other hand, Si-nc can act as trapping centers. The amount of charge stored in Si-nc has been estimated through the change induced in the barrier height measured from the I-V characteristics. The results show that only ~ 20% of the Si-nc are charged, demonstrating that the electrical behavior at the nanoscale is consistent with the macroscopic characterization.
Note: Reproducció del document publicat a: http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.2010626
It is part of: Journal of Applied Physics, 2005, vol. 98, p. 056101-056103
Related resource: http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.2010626
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2445/24883
ISSN: 0021-8979
Appears in Collections:Articles publicats en revistes (Electrònica)

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